How turning 40 made me stop and think

How turning 40 made me stop and think

For many people, including me, it was a big deal turning 40. Entering the second half of my life made me stop and think about what motivates me. Boiled down I think my professional motivation can be summed up as a combination of three factors – challenges, inspiration and freedom. I think the same factors combined with my hopes and dreams for my kids and family also apply to what motivates me personally. In this post I will discuss the three factors from a professional perspective and finally I have picked out one of them from a personal perspective.

Firstly I love being challenged and see people around me develop. Working with Agile Transformation at scale is an awesome challenge of both hearts and minds. The organizations I work with are constantly challenged to adopt a new mindset and many managers need some time to get used to trusting other people in the organization with a bigger responsibility. They need to learn the power of pushing authority as low down in the organization as possible where there still is sufficient clarity and competence to get the job done. As the people in the companies starts to “get it”, they take more and more ownership of the process and tweak it in new ways that suite their needs. They often undergo a personal transformation in the process and ultimately I can leave knowing the change in mindset is lasting.

Secondly I find great motivation in learning new stuff I can apply to work. A great source of new inspiration is what my goAgile colleagues constantly bring to the table. They invest time and money in developing new courses, games and other ways of accelerating learning, they study brain science to better understand peoples motivation and behavior, they look to other professions to see what we can learn from them, they speak at conference and share ideas with the Agile community to get feedback on new ideas, just to name some of they ways they keep the ball constantly rolling. But maybe best of all, they are fun be around and they all truly care about how I and the others are doing. This also sometimes leads to them challenging my decisions, but that’s fine because I know they do it to help and without a hidden agenda and as you can read below, the final decisions are mine to make.

Speaking of freedom, I want to share a bit of a discussion we regularly have at goAgile to remind ourselves of it’s importance. We have a very strong core values called “What’s best for the individual, is best for goAgile”. This doesn’t mean that everyone can do whatever they want, but we do have a lot more freedom than most employees when it comes to deciding what we want to work on, how much we want to work, who we want to work with etc. But doesn’t such a high degree of freedom lead to anarchy or acts of extreme selfishness? Actually it doesn’t. With the freedom, or maybe because of it, we feel and act responsibly. Responsibly towards each other, our clients, families and the direction goAgile is heading. Personally this freedom and responsibility to direct my own life is extremely motivation.

As if my work wasn’t challenging enough, I also enjoy taking on a good personal challenge. My next one is completing my second Ironman in July in Roth, Germany. Apart from the challenge of training for the race, it’s also a challenge finding the right balance between spending time with my family, work and following my personal goals. From a professional, family and economic perspective training for an Ironman is a completely irrational thing to do. I’m too old (and slow) to make a career out of it and it takes up a lot of time I could have invested in other things. Spending 10+ hours a week for 6-9 months training for an Ironman does however make perfectly sense to me. I love the process of setting an ambitious goal, planning how to achieve it, execute the plan and finally achieving my goal. Actually I find the process leading up to race day just as fun as the race itself. Once the Ironman is completed I will recalibrate my balance in favor of family and work. I will however still take on new personal challenges in the future and I know that my family, friends and colleagues prefers spending a little less time with me, if it results in a happier colleagues, friend, husband and dad.

Please feel free to use the comments to share what motivates you. I truly hope you are as privileged as me and get to do the things that motivates you.

The Picture above is of me crossing the finish line at my first Ironman in 2012.